Windows PowerShell Scripting and Toolmaking

Course Details
Code: 55039
Tuition (USD): $2,995.00 $2,695.50 • Virtual (5 days)
$3,095.00 $2,785.50 • Classroom (5 days)

Covers advanced Windows PowerShell topics, with an emphasis on building reusable tools. Introduces workflow, reinforces best practices, and teaches a variety of script development and toolmaking techniques.

Skills Gained

  • Describe the correct patterns for building modularized tools in Windows PowerShell
  • Build highly modularized functions that comply with native PowerShell patterns
  • Build controller scripts that expose user interfaces and automate business processes
  • Manage data in a variety of formats
  • Write automated tests for tools
  • Debug tools

Who Can Benefit

This course is intended for administrators in a Microsoft-centric environment who want to build reusable units of automation, automate business processes, and enable less-technical colleagues to accomplish administrative tasks.

Prerequisites

  • Experience at basic Windows administration
  • Experience using Windows PowerShell to query and modify system information
  • Experience using Windows PowerShell to discover commands and their usage
  • Experience using WMI and/or CIM to query system information

Course Details

Outline

Module 1: Tool Design This module explains how to design tools and units of automation that comply with native PowerShell usage patterns. Lessons

  • Tools do one thing
  • Tools are flexible
  • Tools look native
Lab 1: Designing a Tool
  • Design a tool
After completing this module, students will be able to:
  • Describe the native shell patterns that a good tool design should exhibit
Module 2: Start with a Command This module explains how to start the scripting process by beginning in the interactive shell console. Lessons
  • Why start with a command?
  • Discovery and experimentation
Lab 1: Designing a Tool
  • Start with a command
After completing this module, students will be able to:
  • Describe the benefits of discovery and experimentation in the console
  • Discover and experiment with existing commands in the console
Module 3: Build a Basic Function and Module This module explains how to build a basic function and module, using commands already experimented with in the shell. Lessons
  • Start with a basic function
  • Create a script module
  • Check prerequisites
  • Run the new command
Lab 1: Designing a Tool
  • Build a basic function and module
After completing this module, students will be able to:
  • Build a basic function
  • Create a script module
  • Run a command from a script module
Module 4: Adding CmdletBinding and Parameterizing This module explains how to extend the functionality of a tool, parameterize input values, and use CmdletBinding. Lessons
  • About CmdletBinding and common parameters
  • Accepting pipeline input
  • Mandatory-ness
  • Parameter validation
  • Parmeter aliases
Lab 1: Designing a Tool
  • Adding CmdletBinding and Parameterizing
After completing this module, students will be able to:
  • Describe the purpose of CmdletBinding and list common parameters
  • Parameterize a scripts input
  • Define parameters as mandatory
  • Define parameters as accepting pipeline input
  • Define parameter validation
Module 5: Emitting Objects as Output This module explains how to create tools that produce custom objects as output. Lessons
  • Assembling information
  • Constructing and emitting output
  • Quick tests
Lab 1: Designing a Tool
  • Emitting objects as output
After completing this module, students will be able to:
  • Describe the purpose of object-based output
  • Create and output custom objects from a function
Module 6: An Interlude: Changing Your Approach This module explains how to re-think tool design, using concrete examples of how its often done wrong. Lessons
  • Examining a script
  • Critiquing a script
  • Revising the script
Lab 1: No lab
  • Click here to enter text.
After completing this module, students will be able to:
  • Describe the native patterns that a good tool design should exhibit
  • Redesign a script to meet business requirements and conform to native patterns
Module 7: Using Verbose, Warning, and Informational Output This module explains how to use additional output pipelines for better script behaviors. Lessons
  • Knowing the six channels
  • Adding verbose and warning output
  • Doing more with verbose output
  • Informational output
Lab 1: Designing a Tool
  • Using Verbose, Warning, and Informational Output
After completing this module, students will be able to:
  • Describe the six output channels in the shell
  • Write commands that use verbose, warning, and informational output
  • Run commands with extra output enabled
Module 8: Comment-Based Help This module explains how to add comment-based help to tools. Lessons
  • Where to put your help
  • Getting started
  • Going further with comment-based help
  • Broken help
Lab 1: Designing a Tool
  • Comment-based help
After completing this module, students will be able to:
  • Describe the purpose and construction of comment-based help
  • Add comment-based help to a function
  • Identify causes of broken comment-based help
Module 9: Handling Errors This module explains how to create tools that deal with anticipated errors. Lessons
  • Understanding errors and exceptions
  • Bad handling
  • Two reasons for exception handling
  • Handling exceptions in our tool
  • Capturing the actual exception
  • Handling exceptions for non-commands
  • Going further with exception handling
  • Deprecated exception handling
Lab 1: Designing a Tool
  • Handling errors
After completing this module, students will be able to:
  • Describe the native patterns for handling errors in a command
  • Add error handling to a command
  • Run a command and observe error handling behaviors
Module 10: Basic Debugging This module explains how to use native PowerShell script debugging tools. Lessons
  • Two kinds of bugs
  • The ultimate goal of debugging
  • Developing assumptions
  • Write-Debug
  • Set-PSBreakpoint
  • The PowerShell ISE
Lab 1: Designing a Tool
  • Basic debugging
After completing this module, students will be able to:
  • Describe the tools used for debugging in PowerShell
  • Debug a broken script
Module 11: Going Deeper with Parameters This module explains how to further define parameter attributes in a PowerShell command. Lessons
  • Parameter positions
  • Validation
  • Multiple parameter sets
  • Value from remaining arguments
  • Help messages
  • Aliases
  • More CmdletBinding
Lab 1: No Lab
  • Click here to enter text.
After completing this module, students will be able to:
  • Describe the use of positional parameters
  • Describe additional parameter validation methods
  • Describe how to define multiple parameter sets
  • Describe other parameter definition options
Module 12: Writing Full Help This module explains how to create external help for a command. Lessons
  • External help
  • Using PlatyPs
  • Supporting online help
  • About topics
  • Making your help updatable
Lab 1: Designing a Tool
  • Writing full help
After completing this module, students will be able to:
  • Describe the advantages of external help
  • Create external help using PlatyPS and Markdown
Module 13: Unit Testing Your Code This module explains how to use Pester to perform basic unit testing. Lessons
  • Sketching out the test
  • Making something to test
  • Expanding the test
  • Going further with Pester
Lab 1: Designing a Tool
  • Unit testing your code
After completing this module, students will be able to:
  • Describe the purpose of unit testing
  • Write basic unit tests for PowerShell functions
Module 14: Extending Output Types This module explains how to extend objects with additional capabilities. Lessons
  • Understanding types
  • The Extensible Type System
  • Extending an object
  • Using Update-TypeData
Lab 1: No Lab
  • Click here to enter text.
After completing this module, students will be able to:
  • Describe the purpose of the ETS
  • Extend an existing object type
Module 15: Analyzing Your Script This module explains how to use Script Analyzer to support best practices and prevent common problems. Lessons
  • Performing a basic analysis
  • Analyzing the analysis
Lab 1: Designing a Tool
  • Analyzing your script
After completing this module, students will be able to:
  • Describe the use of Script Analyzer
  • Perform a basic script analysis
Module 16: Publishing Your Tools This module explains how to publish tools to public and private repositories. Lessons
  • Begin with a manifest
  • Publishing to PowerShell Gallery
  • Publishing to private repositories
Lab 1: Designing a Tool
  • Publishing your tools
After completing this module, students will be able to:
  • Describe the tool publishing process and requirements
  • Publish a tool to a repository
Module 17: Basic Controllers: Automation Scripts and Menus This module explains how to create controller scripts that put tools to use. Lessons
  • Building a menu
  • Using UIChoice
  • Writing a process controller
Lab 1: Designing a Tool
  • Basic controllers
After completing this module, students will be able to:
  • Describe the purpose of basic controller scripts
  • Write a simple controller script
Module 18: Proxy Functions This module explains how to create and use proxy functions. Lessons
  • A proxy example
  • Creating the proxy base
  • Modifying the proxy
  • Adding or removing parameters
Lab 1: Designing a Tool
  • Proxy functions
After completing this module, students will be able to:
  • Describe the purpose of proxy functions
  • Create a simple proxy function
Module 19: Working with XML Data This module explains how to work with XML data in PowerShell. Lessons
  • Simple: CliXML
  • Importing native XML
  • ConvertTo-XML
  • Creating native XML from scratch
Lab 1: Designing a Tool
  • Working with XML
After completing this module, students will be able to:
  • Describe the use of XML within PowerShell
  • Use XML data within a PowerShell function
Module 20: Working with JSON Data This module explains how to using JSON data in PowerShell. Lessons
  • Converting to JSON
  • Converting from JSON
Lab 1: Designing a Tool
  • Working with JSON data
After completing this module, students will be able to:
  • Describe the use of JSON data within PowerShell
  • Use JSON data within a PowerShell function
Module 21: Working with SQL Server Data This module explains how to use SQL Server from within a PowerShell script. Lessons
  • SQL Server terminology and facts
  • Connecting to the server and database
  • Writing a query
  • Running a query
  • Invoke-SqlCmd
  • Thinking about tool design patterns
Lab 1: No Lab
  • Click here to enter text.
After completing this module, students will be able to:
  • Describe the use of SQL Server from within PowerShell
  • Write and run SQL Server queries
  • Design tools that use SQL Server for data storage
Module 22: Final Exam This module provides a chance for students to use everything they have learned in this course within a practical example. Lessons
  • Lab problem
  • Break down the problem
  • Do the design
  • Test the commands
  • Code the tool
Lab 1: Final Exam
  • Lab one
Lab 2: Final Exam
  • Lab two
After completing this module, students will be able to:
  • Create PowerShell tools, using native design patterns, from business requirements.